May 23, 2021 • 0 comment(s)
Patrick The Bull is meeting his new ladies for the first time. Patrick is a bit "over-conditioned." The seller told me at last weigh in he was over 2,100 pounds. He's also short and rather square. But, he really embodies the classic look of the American Milking Devon. Historic drawings and paintings depict an animal that looks just like Patrick The Bull.
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March 12, 2021 • 0 comment(s)
One of the questions I get asked the most about ordering online is "How do you ship orders?" So, I made a video to show you how we do it. It's a simple video as I do not profess to be an expert at making videos. It's a little over 3 minutes long, I cut lots of extra footage out to make it shorter. To sum it up the first part of the video is taken from a camera strapped to my head while I select meats from the freezer and make notes on a packing list of the weight of each product that is sold by weight (some of our products are sold by the package instead).
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January 9, 2021 • 0 comment(s)
I love reading and I recently treated myself to the book, "Sacred Cow," by Diana Rodgers, registered dietician, and Robb Wolf, former research bio-chemist and Paleo diet expert. The book is much more detailed than the movie, it's well written and well researched. I highly recommend it. I'm sharing with you a little bit today - just a little food for thought as we start the new year.
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October 29, 2020 • 0 comment(s)
I want to take you around the world with me. Not literally - but on a sausage tasting journey. I want you to tell me which sausages you love and which ones you hate. Tell me what you think would improve each sausage. Tell me if I should NEVER make that one again! I promise I'll listen!
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September 20, 2020 • 0 comment(s)
This week, a friend strongly recommended that I use glyphosate, AKA Roundup, to keep our fence lines clear of brush. This is not the first time that friends have tried to convince me of the benefits of glyphosate use.... (Green brush conducts the electricity on the fence straight into the ground with the end result that our fence is not as hot as it should be when there's lots of growth under and around the hot wires.) This friend was well meaning. He was concerned at the amount of time and the wearing effect of this labor (I've let many of the fence lines get away from me this summer and it is now a massive undertaking involving removal of blackberry, multi-flora rose, thorny vines, saplings, tall grass and worse... ).
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September 19, 2020 • 0 comment(s)
Pastured eggs purchased from local farms where you can see and verify production practices win, hands down, every time! Why? Well, have you ever taken a hard look at eggs in the grocery? Ever wondered which eggs your should buy? The labels all sound so..... promising? On those rare occasions that we have been out of eggs (like after one of the kids left the chicken wagon open and we lost most of the laying hens to a predator… ) I began looking a little closer at the labels. After all, if I had to BUY eggs, I wanted to buy eggs that met my own production standards.
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July 4, 2020 • 0 comment(s)
Here on the farm we don't just raise livestock. We utilize the animals to improve our land. This video highlights some of the work that the goats perform for us. When one thinks of goats, one thinks of clearing brush. But they are good for control and removal of invasive plants also.
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June 7, 2020 • 0 comment(s)
We will be making and selling our own sausages soon!
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May 31, 2020 • 0 comment(s)
May 15, 2020 • 0 comment(s)
May 8, 2020 • 0 comment(s)
It's hard to find meat right now and we are doing what we can to keep meat in stock - which includes working with other local farms. There's also a lot going on that is preventing us from processing more animals, read on to find out what some of these reasons are.
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April 19, 2020 • 0 comment(s)
Moving the cows, in Management Intensive Grazing (MIG), mimics the movement of large herds of bison moving across grasslands. Because a domesticated herd is not so big and our cattle feel safe, they do not stay very close together and completely graze one spot before moving on as a wild herd would. In a large paddock, a herd of cattle spread out. Each cow will pick the best forages and eat them down to the ground. This allows less desirable forage species and undesired species to thrive as the cattle avoid eating them. Additionally, when cattle are allowed to continuously graze a large paddock, they often find a tree or other favored spot where they lounge. They drop huge amounts of manure in their favored lounging spot. They also compact the soil from their continuous presence and the constant trampling kills all the forages in the spot.
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